The Alaska Citizen's Guide to the Budget


1.3.1 From Revenue Sources to Total Revenues

The state budget reports the source of the revenues used to pay for the budget, but the revenues actually collected during the year could be greater or less than this amount.

To figure out total state revenues we must adjust revenue sources reported in the budget by the change in the size of the Permanent Fund, the change in the size of the CBR, and the interagency receipts (duplicated appropriations) included in appropriations that are not really revenues flowing into the state treasury.

The change in the size of the Permanent Fund equals new oil revenues flowing in plus any earnings not spent on the dividend or inflation proofing. The change in the size of the CBR is also equal to new revenues flowing in, plus earnings, minus revenues loaned to the general fund to cover its shortfall.

Although the revenues and expenditures of the other, smaller state funds will not always be equal, they are quite close.

From Revenue Sources to Total State Revenues (FY1999) in billions
Revenue Sources Reported in the FY 1999 Budget
$6.71

Add: PF Earnings not Spent

.585
Add: PF Deposits from Oil Revenues
.138
Add: CBR Deposits from Oil Revenues
.055
Add: CBR Earnings
.218
Minus: CBR Draw
-.358
Minus: Interagency Receipts included in Revenue Sources from the Budget
-.454
Statistical Discrepancy
-.007
Equals: Total Revenues Collected in FY 1999
$6.82
Source: Legislative Finance, Summary of Appropriations, the FY98 Session (for FY 1999), and Department of Revenue, Revenue Sources, Spring 1999, and ISER.

 

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